Task force to be formed following bicycle crash that injured Naples man

— The wheels are in motion for a new task force on bicyclist and pedestrian safety following a crash last week in Naples that sent a bicyclist to the hospital.

The nine-person task force will be known as Turning Point, said Patrick Ruff, president of the Naples Pathways Coalition. Plans are underway for an upcoming rally to bring together bicyclists, runners, law enforcement and drivers.

“The primary purpose will be to direct the energy from the incident into the community so there’s more awareness,” Ruff said.

Last Wednesday, a speeding pickup struck bicyclist Chuck Kelly while he was on a morning ride with several dozen other riders. Kelly, 57, was taken to the hospital with a concussion, broken bones and a punctured lung. Naples police cited the driver, 34-year-old Scott R. Hutton, of Key West, for improper passing.

The crash prompted police to put up flashing signs warning drivers about sharing the road and giving bicyclists 3 feet upon passing, as required by state law.

“After what happened with this accident, we wanted to take the time to do some education and campaigning to get the message out there,” said police Chief Tom Weschler.

Weschler said the city has ordered bumper stickers about sharing the road and the 3-foot law for all city vehicles.

“We talked to the Naples Pathways Coalition, and it just seemed like a lot of people are in town for season and we wanted to make the attempt to put the word out there,” he said.

Several members of the group cycling with Kelly said Hutton appeared to be annoyed while following the riders. A crash report says Hutton crossed into a lane of oncoming traffic before hitting Kelly at Crayton Road and Harbour Drive.

Although reports indicate Hutton was going 40 mph in a 30 mph zone, he was not cited for speeding because police did not see the crash and there was no device to corroborate witness accounts, said acting police spokesman Lt. Matt Fletcher.

Kelly was expected to be released from the hospital late Monday, said his wife, Tish Kelly. She said Monday that she was happy the police department was investing in prevention campaigns.

Tish Kelly said the best way to get compliance for the 3-foot law would be for law enforcement to educate drivers and ticket the ones who don’t abide.

“It should be criminal if they don’t give 3 feet,” she said. “They wouldn’t think it was funny if they’d get a huge ticket and fine for it.”

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Comments » 51

Dilbert writes:

Task Force...more talk....

Enforce all traffic laws<> cars and bikes alike.

BonitaTango writes:

Bumper stickers!!! YAY!!
(Problem solved for the bumper sticker manufacturer)
The two main cycle pests: Those who run stop signs with an "I dare you" look in their eyes...and those who ride on sidewalks in the wrong direction, so when you're about to pull into traffic they suddenly appear in your blind right field of vision.

pritchard2020 writes:

Naples is a great place to bike. Naples seriously needs to ticket cars that don't give 3 ft of space big tickets! Be respectful to cyclists or don't drive. Chuck Kelly is absolutely the most respectful cyclist I've ever seen. The truck was wrong. Isn't it funny that NO ONE is printing the name of the driver??

ibestrait writes:

Trying to get around 30-40 bicyclists riding together on a two lane street is no small feat, assuming that they are riding single file. If they are riding abreast as most do, it is impossible. The task force and future "Czar" of Turning Point should take this into consideration.

Heraclitus writes:

The driver was young and from Key West? I spend a lot of time in Key West... loads of cyclists down there, everywhere. The problem is that down in Key West, there really are bikers everywhere, there are very few places you can go fast, and you always have to pay attention to bikers and peds.

BonitaTango writes:

in response to ibestrait:

Trying to get around 30-40 bicyclists riding together on a two lane street is no small feat, assuming that they are riding single file. If they are riding abreast as most do, it is impossible. The task force and future "Czar" of Turning Point should take this into consideration.

Agreed.
4 or more bikers riding together should be required to obtain a permit alike any other parade!

Heraclitus writes:

The area where Hutton lives, near the Ace Hardware, is a particularly busy area for bicycles, with narrow roads. He should be used to sharing the road. Wonder if he was distracted?

Red_Tide writes:

Bikers want to ride on the road with 2000+ lb vehicles flying by them anywhere from 35+ mph. An error between the person in the car and or from the bicyclist and we have a nightmare unfolding. I have an idea though!! Maybe...just maybe, bicyclists will start to use the sidewalks that are made/designated for them and not want to chance their life by unwillingly submitting their signature to play the game "chicken."

Heraclitus writes:

in response to Red_Tide:

Bikers want to ride on the road with 2000+ lb vehicles flying by them anywhere from 35+ mph. An error between the person in the car and or from the bicyclist and we have a nightmare unfolding. I have an idea though!! Maybe...just maybe, bicyclists will start to use the sidewalks that are made/designated for them and not want to chance their life by unwillingly submitting their signature to play the game "chicken."

Sidewalks are not made or "designated" for bikers, they're made for pedestrians. Some of those groups of bikers you see are doing almost 30 mph. That's the speed limit on most city roads, but a dangerous speed for sidewalks. I've given up my road bike and only ride the mountain bike now, and mostly on the sidewalk and I'll tell you, sometimes those peds think they own the sidewalk... except on Gulfshore, where they have a sidewalk, but insist on walking in the bike lane.

upagain writes:

That law was intended for a single bicyclist to bike safely. I dont really think it was intended for bike mobs that take up half the street during morning rush hour. Which really breaks another law....traffic obstruction.

fungui writes:

I have a hard time with the 3' law. If the government really felt it was necessary, maybe they wouldn't design all the roads with a bike lane directly next to the traffic lane. Maybe they might consider making the bike lane 3' apart. Why doesn't the Naples Pathway Coalition take up the inherent design of the roads which directly contradicts they state law they feel so dearly about.

MisterK writes:

The rally could be interesting. NDN can help by providing expanded coverage for those who cannot attend. Bringing people together will be a great opportunity for everyone to gain a uniform interpretation of the laws regarding cycling and traffic.

xaltd1#276012 writes:

Question for "In The Know"... How many tickets have been issued to bicycle riders?

BackcountryBill writes:

A couple of random thoughts.

This area is not bike friendly. It will take infrastructure spending to fix that. Dedicated bike paths that offer at least a twenty mile round trip. I think this makes sense even for folks who don't bike. If we want to attract a younger educated crowd to this area, we will need to spend the money to stay competitive. A younger hipper crowd talks about their times at the halfway point in a 10k run instead of their scores on the front nine; carbon fiber bike frames instead of carbon fiber golf clubs.

Secondly, there are a lot of rude bicyclists that ruin it for the rest of us. One example. I go to my dentist on Livingston and Pine Ridge twice a year for an early morning appointment. There are bicyclists who insist on taking up a traffic lane on Livingston during rush hour when there is a great sidewalk off to the side. Do they work? Do they care if anybody else does?

bobblehead writes:

The anti biking group is portraying Crayton Rd as a thoroughfare and should not have bike riders on it.

The fact remains that a major reason that the road is busy is that it is used by automobiles as a short cut to their destination from using US 41. Having lived in the area for over 20 years, I have witnessed many cars speeding down Crayton Road, with little regard for walkers, runners or bikers.

I infact stood at the intersection of Neapolitan Way and Crayton Road for 5 minutes one morning and counted the cars that didn't stop at the stop sign. 7 out of 10 cars did not come to a complete stop. I hear complaints about bikers, but the cars are just as guilty.

A solution to making Carayton road safer for all, would be to make it difficult for automobiles to drive fast using speed bumps, as they did on Solana Rd.

Crayton road should be returned to a residential street and not a short cut for everyone to speed down.

sledhead writes:

I respect the bikers and love that they are out there and will share the road........however, most of my close calls are from bicyclists not obeying the law. Speeding, running stop signs, running red lights, weaving around pedestrians.....
If you are bicycling for your health, would it kill you to stop for signage? Unfortunately this is a generalization, most obey the law and share the road well, it is the few who we are creating a task force. Start ticketing bicyclists and uncaring motorists and maybe the issue resolves itself.

jaygee writes:

Do you really believe all the bikers and drivers who have no respect for each other are reading this article and start thinking more about each other on the roads? Ha! Think again ...

Yurko writes:

Bicyclists and drivers BOTH need to respect the law and, in the process, one another. The biggest problem I've seen is with large groups of bicyclists doing their Tour de la Napoli, Tour de la Pelican Bay, etc. excursions. They may stop for red lights, but I have yet to see any such large group stop -- individual row by individual row -- for stop signs or pedestrians. Likewise, if they're taking up an entire vehicle lane, some of them will often ride perilously close to the next lane.

HenryChinaski writes:

Cause of accident: vehicle left its lane to get around slow moving vehicle.

Any officer of the law can tell you that when a car leaves its lane that's when accidents happen. Forcing cars to leave their lane to get around a slow moving vehicle increases the probability of fatalities exponentially.

Technology has changed and our laws should change accordingly to address reality. Most of our roads are paved now. Cars now go faster than bikes.

A 5mph vehicle on a 45mph or even a 20mph road is illogical and dangerous. How many bikes do you see on the interstate?

In time this will be addressed. Until then watch out for those few cyclists who insist on clogging up our roads instead of using the bike path or caring enough to ride in an area where they aren't endangering peoples lives.

HenryChinaski writes:

in response to Heraclitus:

Sidewalks are not made or "designated" for bikers, they're made for pedestrians. Some of those groups of bikers you see are doing almost 30 mph. That's the speed limit on most city roads, but a dangerous speed for sidewalks. I've given up my road bike and only ride the mountain bike now, and mostly on the sidewalk and I'll tell you, sometimes those peds think they own the sidewalk... except on Gulfshore, where they have a sidewalk, but insist on walking in the bike lane.

Multiuse paths (sidewalks etc) are ideal for biking and walking as there are no cars and no chance of death by car. At least the risk of death is low rather than probable.

Of the cyclists who insist on clogging the roads 99% are doing 5mph or less. I have seen cyclists going faster than 5 Mph on two or three occasions.

HenryChinaski writes:

in response to Heraclitus:

The driver was young and from Key West? I spend a lot of time in Key West... loads of cyclists down there, everywhere. The problem is that down in Key West, there really are bikers everywhere, there are very few places you can go fast, and you always have to pay attention to bikers and peds.

I enjoy biking in key west. As the guys at the bike shop will tell you, "watch out for cars."

The biking culture in key west is one of mindful awareness of drunks by cyclists. The biking culture in Naples is one of extreme entitlement.

I like the way people bike in Key West, they have an awareness as to what is going on around them and they react accordingly.

Heraclitus writes:

in response to BackcountryBill:

A couple of random thoughts.

This area is not bike friendly. It will take infrastructure spending to fix that. Dedicated bike paths that offer at least a twenty mile round trip. I think this makes sense even for folks who don't bike. If we want to attract a younger educated crowd to this area, we will need to spend the money to stay competitive. A younger hipper crowd talks about their times at the halfway point in a 10k run instead of their scores on the front nine; carbon fiber bike frames instead of carbon fiber golf clubs.

Secondly, there are a lot of rude bicyclists that ruin it for the rest of us. One example. I go to my dentist on Livingston and Pine Ridge twice a year for an early morning appointment. There are bicyclists who insist on taking up a traffic lane on Livingston during rush hour when there is a great sidewalk off to the side. Do they work? Do they care if anybody else does?

Good point, Bill. For some reason that beautiful bike lane on Livingston north of Pine Ridge ends at Pine Ridge. I wonder whose bright idea that was?

As you go south of Pine Ridge on Livingston there's only an 8 ft wide sidewalk on the east side, but it's a great ride even for a road bike except for one or two places, and in all the years I biked it to and from work, I only almost got hit by a turning car once. She misjudged my speed... I really had to swerve and brake. I chased her into the development she was turning into and was promptly told to go F myself... no apology... young, fat, and nasty. It is what it is.

You're right about bikers not needing to be in the roadway there and from Golden Gate down to Radio, although there's always broken glass on the sidewalk where the Golden Gate Canal bridge is... probably bottles thrown against the concrete wall.

Wonder who's on that committee?

Heraclitus writes:

in response to HenryChinaski:

Multiuse paths (sidewalks etc) are ideal for biking and walking as there are no cars and no chance of death by car. At least the risk of death is low rather than probable.

Of the cyclists who insist on clogging the roads 99% are doing 5mph or less. I have seen cyclists going faster than 5 Mph on two or three occasions.

Henry... you must not travel the same roads I do. I've slowed down to 16-17 mph over the years, on my mountain bike, and I get passed on a regular basis by folks doing well over 20.

Get a cateye for your bike... constant speed and distance readout, and cheap.... 5 mph is almost too slow to stay upright.

Heraclitus writes:

If anyone out there cycles with that group, I'm curious what your usual speed is?

PMC_Rider writes:

Henry, you are so, so full of it.

Crayton Rd HAS CYCLE PATHS called out in the paint. Significant stretches of the road, including where this accident occurred, sport bright white paint indicating that cyclists are granted a portion of the lane. Crayton Rd is NOT the secondary highway you apparently think it is. The residents of Park Shore surely disagree with you as well.

The Naples Velos, with whom Mr Kelly was riding, typically AVERAGE 24mph over a 2 hour ride. Not 5mph. Your gross mischaracterization of cyclists is just an attempt to skew facts. In reality, these cyclists were probably doing the posted speed limit, or were well within range of it. In claiming otherwise, you're either ignorant, or a liar.

Lastly, "multi-use" sidewalks are no more suitable for road cyclists than they are for cars. Again, road cyclists approach speeds of 30mph. Do you really think a 4ft wide, bumpy sidewalk, broken up by driveways every 100ft, is suitable for road bikes? And "no chance of death by car?" Really? Because cars never come flying out to the edge of the road, through crosswalks? Right..

Let me tell you, from personal experience, that the sidewalks in Naples are an absolute death trap for anyone on a road bike. I have found myself with nowhere else to go, on the southern end of Livingston, where the bike lane abruptly ends and the only reprieve is a "multi-use" sidewalk on the northbound side of the road. Try heading south down that some evening and see how you make out. See if there's "no chance of death by car." I think you'll find the exact opposite true.

But to that point, because Livingston is impassable in the southbound direction by bike, I actually tack 6 additional miles onto my evening commute and take -- you guessed it -- Crayton Rd. Why? Because it's one of the few roads in this town that IS MEANT TO BE CYCLIST-FRIENDLY.

It's painfully obvious that you know nothing about bike culture, neither here nor in Key West. If you were actually a cyclist, you'd see things entirely differently. But good luck holding onto your hostility towards cyclists. You'll feel so vindicated when you murder one.

PMC_Rider writes:

in response to Heraclitus:

If anyone out there cycles with that group, I'm curious what your usual speed is?

I addressed this in my post above. I have ridden with the Velos. Typical average is 24mph. Speed will range from 22-28 throughout the ride depending on the wind direction.

PMC_Rider writes:

Heraclitus, it sounds like we have the same bike commute. I'm traveling from Radio Rd to Mercato. Livingston to Vanderbilt in the morning, Pelican Bay and Crayton to Gulf Shore, 5th Ave to Davis to the Greenway in the evening. It's about 28 miles, round trip. It's a great commute, but in-season I'm weary of the HenryChinaskis of the world.

zurich writes:

If you think drivers and bicyclers are the only ones violating the laws, you should live in a golfing community .Golf cart drivers aren't aware of the laws ,and obeying those laws is very seldom observed .I think it goes along with their egotistical perception that they are god's given gift as a golfer ,and "get out of my way ,you peon" .

upagain writes:

We are trying to compare cyclists to bicyclists? Apples to oranges. Crayton Rd for Bicyclists going to the beach with their beach bag is ideal and should be protected. Cyclists doing 25 in a group is not what Crayton was meant for and as a cyclist why would you. Please tell me what is the appeal of Crayton for a serious rider. If you are actually acknowleging the stop signs its stop and go, especially at average speed 24. Then throw in the cross cars, no thanks.. PMC Rider, I heard Mark Cavendish is thinking about training on Crayton Rd he loves the stop signs every 1/2 mile.

Upwiththebirds writes:

This is just dreaming, but I wish there was a way do away with cars forever. It doesn't matter what kind of car it is, to me they are just a box of steel that kills animals and people. People would be so much healthier, the city would be a lot prettier without parking lots and big intersections, people might be nicer, and they would save so much money...I'm not a biker (it's too scary to me) but If Naples were like Mackinac Island, I would get a bike and ride it everywhere.

HenryChinaski writes:

My car has a speedometer. I know how fast cyclists are going.

I should clarify my statement, on roads where biking fast is a good idea I often see cyclists going 15-20 mph. Livingston and Vanderbilt road are two examples of wide open stretches where it is possible to get exercise and ride any speed you want.

A highly congested road like Crayton is the last place people should go for speed and I assume this is why I never see cyclists on Crayton going faster than a crawl.

I am also a cyclist but I don't endanger other peoples lives with my riding habits. I'm just considerate that way.

HenryChinaski writes:

in response to upagain:

We are trying to compare cyclists to bicyclists? Apples to oranges. Crayton Rd for Bicyclists going to the beach with their beach bag is ideal and should be protected. Cyclists doing 25 in a group is not what Crayton was meant for and as a cyclist why would you. Please tell me what is the appeal of Crayton for a serious rider. If you are actually acknowleging the stop signs its stop and go, especially at average speed 24. Then throw in the cross cars, no thanks.. PMC Rider, I heard Mark Cavendish is thinking about training on Crayton Rd he loves the stop signs every 1/2 mile.

Any person who rides a bike is by definition a cyclist. You cannot wish away the majority of cyclists due to their preferring common sense over forcing the legal issue.

The majority of cyclists prefer common sense. Those that insist on forcing the issue and create traffic hazards are in a small minority.

upagain writes:

in response to HenryChinaski:

Any person who rides a bike is by definition a cyclist. You cannot wish away the majority of cyclists due to their preferring common sense over forcing the legal issue.

The majority of cyclists prefer common sense. Those that insist on forcing the issue and create traffic hazards are in a small minority.

I believe I defined the two for conversational comparison, not by Webster.

HenryChinaski writes:

in response to upagain:

I believe I defined the two for conversational comparison, not by Webster.

People in the past have tried to cherry pick who is and isn't a cyclist to suit their argument. My apologies if I offended you.

BonitaTango writes:

in response to Upwiththebirds:

This is just dreaming, but I wish there was a way do away with cars forever. It doesn't matter what kind of car it is, to me they are just a box of steel that kills animals and people. People would be so much healthier, the city would be a lot prettier without parking lots and big intersections, people might be nicer, and they would save so much money...I'm not a biker (it's too scary to me) but If Naples were like Mackinac Island, I would get a bike and ride it everywhere.

Kathmandu awaits you!

BonitaTango writes:

This is just dreaming, but I wish there was a way do away with bikes on heavily trafficked roads so I wouldn't worry about someone hitting my pickup as I swerve to avoid the pest pedaling up a bridge at 10mph in a 45 mph zone...

No1Uno writes:

in response to BonitaTango:

This is just dreaming, but I wish there was a way do away with bikes on heavily trafficked roads so I wouldn't worry about someone hitting my pickup as I swerve to avoid the pest pedaling up a bridge at 10mph in a 45 mph zone...

Most people can't hit you since they have already driven off the road trying to avoid all the McDonalds bags and empty beer cans flying out of the back of your pick up.

Another dream, but getting rid of trucks would be even better, if not safer for everybody.

BonitaTango writes:

in response to No1Uno:

Most people can't hit you since they have already driven off the road trying to avoid all the McDonalds bags and empty beer cans flying out of the back of your pick up.

Another dream, but getting rid of trucks would be even better, if not safer for everybody.

Keep dreaming mon cher...

Heraclitus writes:

in response to PMC_Rider:

Heraclitus, it sounds like we have the same bike commute. I'm traveling from Radio Rd to Mercato. Livingston to Vanderbilt in the morning, Pelican Bay and Crayton to Gulf Shore, 5th Ave to Davis to the Greenway in the evening. It's about 28 miles, round trip. It's a great commute, but in-season I'm weary of the HenryChinaskis of the world.

I cycle up and down Crayton as part of my route if the wind is from the south. Sometimes I go over to Gulfshore. I'm retired now so no more "commuting" and no schedules to meet.

I started using that stretch of Livingston between Pine Ridge and Golden Gate on my commute because I couldn't get the County to improve the segment of Airport Road between Pine Ridge and Golden Gate. Lost cause for one of the most heavily biked sidewalks in Collier County. All those pretty new paths out in the boonies, but no improvements where it matters.

On a bike a couple of extra miles isn't a chore... it's a workout... even in a driving rain.

P.S. Lots of guys in the County on Horseshoe Drive bike commute. They should probably get a few of them on that task force.

gcop writes:

If the group riders want to ride Crayton Road and other narrow roads in the city maybe they should not be allowed during busy traffic hours. No group riding between 8:00 am and 6:00 pm might help to satisfy everyone and keep them save. The groups can still get their ride but not be on the roads when they are at their busiest. Just an idea. I personally do not want group riders on the sidewalks.

PMC_Rider writes:

in response to gcop:

If the group riders want to ride Crayton Road and other narrow roads in the city maybe they should not be allowed during busy traffic hours. No group riding between 8:00 am and 6:00 pm might help to satisfy everyone and keep them save. The groups can still get their ride but not be on the roads when they are at their busiest. Just an idea. I personally do not want group riders on the sidewalks.

Yea, or you could go pound sand, because, you know, bikes have the same legal status as cars.

Bikes are here to stay. In fact, you will only see more of them as time goes on. They are quieter, healthier and sustainable. They create less traffic. They decrease the need for unsightly parking lots. The cost? You may have to take 20 seconds out of your super important day to pass a cyclist respectfully, legally and without murdering them. Do you think you can deal with that?

HenryChinaski writes:

in response to PMC_Rider:

Yea, or you could go pound sand, because, you know, bikes have the same legal status as cars.

Bikes are here to stay. In fact, you will only see more of them as time goes on. They are quieter, healthier and sustainable. They create less traffic. They decrease the need for unsightly parking lots. The cost? You may have to take 20 seconds out of your super important day to pass a cyclist respectfully, legally and without murdering them. Do you think you can deal with that?

You miss the point. When a vehicle leaves it's lane the potential for fatalities goes up exponentially.

In some cases it might be three seconds to get around a bike. In most cases the line of cars that forms behind the cyclist does a reasonable job of getting around the slow moving vehicle and it may only take minutes, or less.

The big problem though is the little old lady four cars up who won't pass the bike despite no oncoming traffic. In this case you are forced to drive at 5 mph for an indeterminate amount of time. After 20 minutes of this people become agitated and start taking unnecessary risks. I've seen this scenario play out countless times as I drive north on Vanderbilt drive. A single cyclist would turn a ten minute drive into a forty minute drive. Stuck behind a bike old lady combo I would get passed by cyclists using the multi use path!

I've seen cars pass on the shoulder on the right, most common is the guy ten cars back who goes for it and nearly kills everyone. Just to get around a cyclist.

All because the cyclist refused to use the path.

For some reason that cyclist insisted on clogging up the road instead of using the path like all the other cyclists.

Heraclitus writes:

in response to gcop:

If the group riders want to ride Crayton Road and other narrow roads in the city maybe they should not be allowed during busy traffic hours. No group riding between 8:00 am and 6:00 pm might help to satisfy everyone and keep them save. The groups can still get their ride but not be on the roads when they are at their busiest. Just an idea. I personally do not want group riders on the sidewalks.

Or we could encourage motorists to use route 41 unless they have business or live on Crayton. Only a few blocks out of the way.

Not much difference between 25 mph and 30 mph. You'll arrive a mile down the road less than 30 seconds later doing 25 as doing 30. What's the rush? Is it worth a life?.

Heraclitus writes:

in response to HenryChinaski:

You miss the point. When a vehicle leaves it's lane the potential for fatalities goes up exponentially.

In some cases it might be three seconds to get around a bike. In most cases the line of cars that forms behind the cyclist does a reasonable job of getting around the slow moving vehicle and it may only take minutes, or less.

The big problem though is the little old lady four cars up who won't pass the bike despite no oncoming traffic. In this case you are forced to drive at 5 mph for an indeterminate amount of time. After 20 minutes of this people become agitated and start taking unnecessary risks. I've seen this scenario play out countless times as I drive north on Vanderbilt drive. A single cyclist would turn a ten minute drive into a forty minute drive. Stuck behind a bike old lady combo I would get passed by cyclists using the multi use path!

I've seen cars pass on the shoulder on the right, most common is the guy ten cars back who goes for it and nearly kills everyone. Just to get around a cyclist.

All because the cyclist refused to use the path.

For some reason that cyclist insisted on clogging up the road instead of using the path like all the other cyclists.

Henry... if I were you, with all the problems you see, I'd start carrying a camcorder. That way you can prove your point to the task force.

Actually, I've never seen anything like you describe in the thirty-something years I've lived, biked and driven down here, and I've travelled Vanderbilt Drive quite a lot by car and bike. I'd like to see it just once... and not "staged", please.

gcop writes:

in response to PMC_Rider:

Yea, or you could go pound sand, because, you know, bikes have the same legal status as cars.

Bikes are here to stay. In fact, you will only see more of them as time goes on. They are quieter, healthier and sustainable. They create less traffic. They decrease the need for unsightly parking lots. The cost? You may have to take 20 seconds out of your super important day to pass a cyclist respectfully, legally and without murdering them. Do you think you can deal with that?

This was a suggestion only. I'm trying to find a solution that fits all!
Please tell me why you think a group of 12+ riders belongs on a busy narrow road like Crayton during peak traffic hours? Those groups are practicing for road races, they certainly are not on their way to the beach.
I also think maybe it time for the people who live in the City of Naples to get some rules put together and vote on them.
Btw, my post was a respectful suggestion. Your answer shows your lack of respect for car drivers who might also be the residents who live in the area.

gcop writes:

in response to Heraclitus:

Or we could encourage motorists to use route 41 unless they have business or live on Crayton. Only a few blocks out of the way.

Not much difference between 25 mph and 30 mph. You'll arrive a mile down the road less than 30 seconds later doing 25 as doing 30. What's the rush? Is it worth a life?.

I wish more motorists would used 41 but signs are already posted, no trucks, and we all know how many trucks there are on that road. Signs don't work.

gcop writes:

I also hope this task force includes walkers, car drivers, and residents.

BonitaTango writes:

in response to PMC_Rider:

Yea, or you could go pound sand, because, you know, bikes have the same legal status as cars.

Bikes are here to stay. In fact, you will only see more of them as time goes on. They are quieter, healthier and sustainable. They create less traffic. They decrease the need for unsightly parking lots. The cost? You may have to take 20 seconds out of your super important day to pass a cyclist respectfully, legally and without murdering them. Do you think you can deal with that?

"Pound sand" an interesting concept unfamiliar to me...is it meant to insult?

The average Neapolitan within city limits is getting too old to ride a bike ergo you'll be seeing fewer cyclists. More wheelchairs perhaps but fewer bikes. Wheelchairs tend to stay on sidewalks unless the pushee is a former cyclist wearing spandex with playing cards laundry-pinned to his wheel spokes.
That said, I wish Chuck a speedy complete recovery

PMC_Rider writes:

in response to BonitaTango:

"Pound sand" an interesting concept unfamiliar to me...is it meant to insult?

The average Neapolitan within city limits is getting too old to ride a bike ergo you'll be seeing fewer cyclists. More wheelchairs perhaps but fewer bikes. Wheelchairs tend to stay on sidewalks unless the pushee is a former cyclist wearing spandex with playing cards laundry-pinned to his wheel spokes.
That said, I wish Chuck a speedy complete recovery

You're wrong, per usual. Median age in Naples is falling, not rising. Check any census.

BonitaTango writes:

The only segment of the Naples population that grew 2000-2010 was 65 and above.
From 42% to 48%
Projections show an acceleration of this trend.
Perhaps you were thinking G.G. I'm talking Naples.
http://censusviewer.com/city/FL/Naples

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